Election won't end abortion/contraception debate

NEW YORK (AP) — Democrats and liberal advocacy groups have declared victory in what they called a Republican "war on women" and are celebrating the defeats of some GOP candidates who took rigid stands against abortion.

However, the issues in dispute — notably access to contraception and abortion — are far from settled, and social conservatives are already girding for new confrontations.

Anti-abortion leader Marjorie Dannenfelser said Republican nominee Mitt Romney was too defensive on abortion-related issues. She mentioned Florida Sen. Marco Rubio and Indiana s governor-elect, Mike Pence, as potential presidential candidates who'd be more effective.

For activists supporting family planning programs and access to abortion, the election produced a series of triumphs, including the re-election of President Barack Obama. He won about 55 percent of women's votes.

Copyright 2014 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

 

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Nicknamed the “Sunshine State,” Florida has a population of over 18.5 million people. Major cities include the capital of Tallahassee, Jacksonville, Orlando, Miami and Pensacola.
 
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Governor: Rick Scott
Lieutenant Governor: Jennifer Carroll
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State Treasurer: Jeff Atwater
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